Sunday, February 25, 2007

Redbush tea

The dietician wants me to start reintroducing some very low-salicylate foods, such as carrots, mushrooms, mangoes and maybe even onions.

She's also unable to say whether redbush tea is any good. Most herbal teas are dangerous but caffeine-free tea is okay.

Redbush is a caffeine-free, low tannin strain of real tea so should be okay. So yesterday I had a cup of redbush and a raw carrot, followed by carrots for lunch today.

One or other does not work, almost certainly the redbush tea. By yesterday evening my vision was blurred and print was out of focus. Today I have had to apply Anthisan cream to my midriff as large itchy red spots emerged. And I have a tummy ache.

12 comments:

Anonymous said...

Interesting your dietician says caffeine free tea is ok, my alergist has advised no tea at all. Drinking only water, milk and decaf coffee is no fun.

pf said...

Are you not allowed to drink chocolate?

I must admit I'm learning to enjoy the different tastes of water, tap and spring!

RAS said...

No caffeine free teas are any good I've discovered - but they were not on my original list.

Kim Mobey said...

"Redbush tea" as you call it is not a form of ordinary tea. Redbush tea is also known as Rooibos and it's made from Aspalathus linearis, a plant found in Southern Africa.

Check out the side of the tea packageing and read this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rooibos to find out more.

Regular caffein-and-tannin tea is made from a completely different species of plant called Camellia sinensis. Once again, check the tea packaging to confirm this.

Kim Mobey said...

Erm... please excuse my spelling in the previous post ;)

diatpillen said...

Redbush is also called Rooibus tea. It has lot of health benefits. Rooibos helps delay the aging process! Rooibos helps to relieve stomach ulcers, nausea, constipation, and heartburn. Rooibos helps to give you strong bones and teeth because of its calcium, manganese and fluoride content.

Anonymous said...

Rooibos is NOT any form of tea, as mentioned. I would never use Wikipedia for any information as it is frequently corrupted and still remains as posted. (See their own disclaimers). Other sources are far more reliable.

If your dietician is so ignorant on what tea is or isn't, er..., I think it's time to find someone who knows what they're doing.

RAS said...

Anonymous, you're commenting on an old posting. The dietician went away and checked redbush specifically for salicylates. However your comment raises the interesting question as to how many food substances have actually been tested for salicylate. So far as its status as tea, all I can say is that it's currently being marketed on British TV as a kind of tea!

Anonymous said...

It may be spoken of as "tea" on television, but that is just a vague, general term for different infusions. Caffeinated teas including the white, green, oolongs and fully oxidized teas are all from the same species of tree which was first domesticated somewhere in China and then transformed into various cultivars throughout Asia, besides the Indian Assamica subspecies. Rooibos, chamomile, and these various other herbs are produced from different plants entirely. Rooibos bushes are not related to the tea tree chamilia sinensis.

PJ said...

I have little doubt about redbush tea having salicylate content enough to trouble me.I have even opened the tea bag and used the leaves in an infuser at a weak concentration,as I do like a change of flavour. But, alas, it does give me stomach ache and affects my concentration and clarity of vision. I have just got some new variafocal glasses and found that my vision was marginally blurred for 24 hours after a beaker of weak redbush tea. Camomile tea does the same thing.

PJ

RAS said...

That's interesting. Camomile is meant to be salycilate free and I have not had a problem with that. Also interesting to find someone else who finds blurred vision a big problem. Thankfully I don't get stomach pains from redbush when I have flu or a heavy cold.

PJ said...

Camomile is said by some sources to be salicylate free. Other sources disagree with this. I did find other sources that confirmed that to be the case, and from stopping it, I've had no bother ,unless I cheat.

PJ