Tuesday, December 05, 2006

Salicylate free, taste free

A totally salicylate free diet is proving hard.

I have twice been out for turkey dinners. Even by avoiding stuffing and picking and choosing vegetables it seems hard to avoid the herbs that get into the cooking. Tonight's of turkey slices, brussels sprouts and roast potatoes was not particularly pleasant nor did me any good.

Sunday lunch was possibly the worst I've had in my life, consisting of hard, dry chicken pieces, undercooked cabbage and roast potatoes.

By Christmas Day I think we will have worked out how to make herb and pepper free gravy.

Last night I ended up having a sort of Chinese-Italian meal. Spaghetti topped with mince stir fried with soy sauce, cabbage, celery and potato slices. Not bad if I could work out how to make it a little juicier.

I have purchased two papayas but have no idea how to eat them. I don't dare cut one open for fear it will need hours of preparation. My latest purchase of bananas is nearly gone. Also obtained some cashew nuts which were excessively salty and pretty tasteless once the salt was washed off.

20 comments:

Mandy said...

I came across your blog in a search for information on salicylate allergy/intolerance. I believe we're about to get that diagnosis from our pediatrician regarding my almost 2 year old daughter.

I'll be checking back with you, to be sure.

Anonymous said...

Hi,
I have the same problem with salicylates and it seems quite challenging to find help in the UK. There has been alot of research done by the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital in Australia within their Allergy Unit. They have a website which might be helpful and also you can buy diet guideline booklets and even a recipe book which tries to assist with the limited variety of food choices we are faced with.
You may find it helpful
http://www.cs.nsw.gov.au/rpa/allergy/

Amy said...

I knew since I was 5 that I was allergic to asperine, but I didn't know until now that it was in a larger group called salicylate. I had a bad cold, and I noticed that my doctor wrote "salicylate allergy" on the paperwork. I had never heard that term before (now 32 yrs. old), so I thought I would check it out for myself. Why hadn't they told me? I wonder how long it's been in my medical records. ?? I've been diagnosed with all sorts of rhinisitis (sp), and always have allergies. I just assumed it was seasonal, now I guess it could be related to foods. I always get canker sores in my mouth from eating raw onions, but can tolerate cooked onions. Onions seem low on the salicylate list, so I wonder why I have such a strong reaction to them. I can get the canker sores to go away by putting raw ginger on the sores, but it is listed high on the salicylate list, so that seems to be a little contridictory (sp).

Andrea said...

I've also got salicylate intolerance. I've worked out that pretty much as it builds up in my system i get more run down, itchy eyes,over tired, lethargic and pile on the kilo's......

I did a 7 week low salicylate diet and felt amazing afterward, but i agree with you it's extremely difficult to maintain it.

After a few months of it, i need to go back on again..and i think that on off will be forever- back on the diet when the salicylates build up in my system and i feel crap, and back off when i feel better. I think part of the problem is it is so limited you can't be getting all the nutrients you need.

The other suggestion i got is that Salicylates are highest when the fruit/veg are picked pre-full ripeness, which is pretty much anything from a super market. If you can grow your own you can pick them just before they go bad and the salicylate levels are dropping down again.

These are some receipes i like:


Prawns with lime and garlic is good and brown rice,

Getting a mince meat/red bean mix with some garlic, lemon and chives, mixed till the beans mush up a bit, with rice tacos and sour cream, lettuce and cheese....Salicylate free mexican.

The other thing that is nice is saffron rice with chicken, and a little bit of roast pumpkin.

For something more asian style, pile on the snow peas,bean sprouts, shallots, a fish/meat of choice, fried up in a wok with garlic and cashews, with a garlic/maple syrup/sunfloweroil sauce/lime/parsley .I haven't worked out whether fish sauce would work, to make it more asian flavoured...Ok, it's not that asian but better than nothing.

Then the other one is good old dahl - lentils with ghee, maple syrup, garlic, ....served up with rice.

Anonymous said...

I have been helping my 11 year old sone deal with his allergy since he was 5. we have a few select favourite recipes but he has a good mind set about it all which has helped the most, his words were "I am going to be healthy Mum". It also doesnt hurt that he eats plain pasta because he enjoys it not because he has too. The main thing I have learned through listening to him is keep your basic list of foods to eat and avoid but listen to your body as it will let you know when its not right for you, there are some foods that my son should be able to eat but he wont because he can feel the effects of them. The easiest way I have dealt with all the issues over food is to go back to baking and there are so many variations on recipies that can be readily changed to suit the sufferer. The best sugar I have found is the plant sugar Stevia, he has no reaction from this and it is so strong 1/10th the amount is needed so cakes and bisciuts are so incredibly light and taste amazing with this product. Its available in Australia but I dont know about elsewhere.

Jtoz54 said...

I have been allergic to aspirin, Salicylate Intolerant my whole life. I suffered my whole life with Migraines, dizziness, vomiting, dry bloodshot eyes, fatigue, and developed arthritis and asthma as I got older. 3 yrs.ago I thought I was gonna die. I could hardly breath and the prednisone my dr.prescribed didnt work nor did the nebulizer. I knew I was allergic to aspirin so I typed in foods containing salicylates. When I saw all the fruits and vegetables, olive oil, coffee, tea etc. I was shocked. Here I was eating healthy and killing myself with salicylates. I gave up all foods moderate to very high in salicylates and two days later I was all better.My dr.is a vegetarian and didn't believe me. He is still in denial so I had to switch doctors. 2 days later my Asthma was all gone, my arthritis is gone, my headaches are gone, my bloodshot eyes cleared up and I have more energy. I read everything I could on the internet.Thank God for the information on the internet cause there was no book at Barnes Noble at that time. I really wanted to help other people in my situation so I wrote a book called"SALICYLATE INTOLERANCE AND THE HEALTHIER I ATE THE SICKER I GOT" BY Joan Tozzi Ablahani. It's a great handbook in which I compiled all the symptoms and foods and created some really tasty recipes that are Sal-free. It's on Amazon.com. I am not telling you this to make money, I am passionate about helping other people so they don't suffer needlessly like i did for 50 years. My favorite recipe is:
Cabbage lentil barley soup.
2qt.chicken broth (I make my own)
1cup dried lentils
1 cup dried barley
1 small or 1/2 large cabbage cut up
salt, garlic powder, Throw it all together and cook for 50 min. enjoy, Joan

Jtoz54 said...

I have been allergic to aspirin, Salicylate Intolerant my whole life. I suffered my whole life with Migraines, dizziness, vomiting, dry bloodshot eyes, fatigue, and developed arthritis and asthma as I got older. 3 yrs.ago I thought I was gonna die. I could hardly breath and the prednisone my dr.prescribed didnt work nor did the nebulizer. I knew I was allergic to aspirin so I typed in foods containing salicylates. When I saw all the fruits and vegetables, olive oil, coffee, tea etc. I was shocked. Here I was eating healthy and killing myself with salicylates. I gave up all foods moderate to very high in salicylates and two days later I was all better.My dr.is a vegetarian and didn't believe me. He is still in denial so I had to switch doctors. 2 days later my Asthma was all gone, my arthritis is gone, my headaches are gone, my bloodshot eyes cleared up and I have more energy. I read everything I could on the internet.Thank God for the information on the internet cause there was no book at Barnes Noble at that time. I really wanted to help other people in my situation so I wrote a book called"SALICYLATE INTOLERANCE AND THE HEALTHIER I ATE THE SICKER I GOT" BY Joan Tozzi Ablahani. It's a great handbook in which I compiled all the symptoms and foods and created some really tasty recipes that are Sal-free. It's on Amazon.com. I am not telling you this to make money, I am passionate about helping other people so they don't suffer needlessly like i did for 50 years. My favorite recipe is:
Cabbage lentil barley soup.
2qt.chicken broth (I make my own)
1cup dried lentils
1 cup dried barley
1 small or 1/2 large cabbage cut up
salt, garlic powder, Throw it all together and cook for 50 min. enjoy, Joan

Anonymous said...

I have found your site very helpful- I have been recently diagnosed with salicylate allergy.
In the recipe for Tuna Con Chips - What are the kentucky chips you have used? I am in Australia.

RAS said...

Hi anonymous, Colonel Sanders Kentucky Fried Chicken! I'm not recommending them - it was because someone brought them from the takeaway that night. It would probably work with any takeaway chips - although you can never be sure what kind of oil they are cooked in, so not ideal.

Canadian said...

Amy, in regards to onion, either in the book Friendly Food or in the chart my ND gave me, onions is listed as either high or very high in salicylates. My ND recommends to err on the side of caution when there are contradictions from different sources by avoiding the food if one source says it's too high. I know, contradictions make it hard to keep track if what's okay to eat!

Canadian said...

Hm, in the last sentence of that previous comment I posted, I meant it's hard to keep track OF what's ok to eat.

Anonymous said...

If you`re unsure about onions, then use leeks or shallots instead.

Angela said...

I have found that soy contains salicylates as well.

RAS said...

Angela, how do you know this? If true it is bad news as soy has become a fundamental part of my diet. Guess I'd have to try Marmite

Anonymous said...

Hi,
I also have a salicylate intolerance and am managed via the RPAH Allergy Unit in Australia. RAS if you have a salicylate intolerance you cannot eat marmite. Onions are to be avoided and you can only have leek and spring onoins, chives and garlic. Andrea, your intolerance must be mild if you can eat lemons and limes as they are not recommended. I am vegan and I dont find it very difficult until I have to go out for a meal. If you have the Friendly Foods book from RPAH you can adapt recipes quite easily and make meals from Recipes to the Rescue and make substitute the food with that which you can tolerate. The biggest issue I experience is the amount of salt I add to food however the more pear juice and chives I add the less salt I am inclined to include. People also need to know whether they have an intolerance or allergy as they are two very different physiological issues.

RAS said...

Thanks for these comments. I'm not a marmite person so have never actually tried it. Didn't think garlic was okay - always understood it was only leek and shallot.

I always find it interesting how well organised things are in Australia - is there a genetic tendency down under?
regards
RAS

Jessie said...

Hey there, there is a list of true low in salicylate foods on my blog taken from the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital guide book. I hope this can help everyone, they are the leading experts in this area. http://thehealthyjessie.wordpress.com/

Angela said...

Hi RAS. I'm still in the process of figuring out what I can and cannot eat (does that process ever end?). Some of the things you have listed as being able to consume, I have had reactions to. Soy makes me lose consciousness. Peas make my tongue swell, and just a touch (literal touch) of lettuce to my food sends me into the fetal position writhing in abdominal pain. Soaps containing salicylates will make make skin either break out in a rash, swell, or blister. Mint, especially spearmint, creates blisters in my mouth. I took a medication that was not supposed to be consumed by those allergic to NSAIDs to which it took the hearing in one of my ears. After passing out often, even damaging my shoulder in the process which needed surgery to repair, they finally realized that I was taking a vitamin in the form of a gel cap. They use soy to get the right consistency of the gel capsule. I stopped taking it and stopped passing out. I consume soy, and it triggers another episode. I've been to neurologists, a neuro opthamalogist, and my regular doctor and allergist. I'm frustrated over the lack of help and information available. It's not their fault, there is just so little info out there for them. My first reaction to aspirin was when I was an infant, but nobody thought of salicylates until one night after eating fresh garden peas, my tongue started swelling. Being that it was late at night and my family was in bed (now in my 30's) I started to look for answers on the web. That is when I discovered what peas and aspirin have in common. I'm just wondering if you can give me any tips, info...anything...
Could you possibly make a list of what as affected you, and I could do likewise?
Thank you.

Anonymous said...

I am salicylate and amine intolerant. So the list of foods, drinks, toiletries, cosmetics, cleaning products, etc I can tolerate is even smaller. However sticking to a fail-safe diet not only have the symptom of both the salicylate and amine intolerance have improved I have found that my sense of taste and smell have improved. My recommendation for those who suffer from food intolerance is to look at the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital Allergy Unit's website http://www.sswahs.nsw.gov.au/RPA/Allergy/resources/foodintol/ffintro.html Another site I recommend is the Food Intolerance Network's website Fedup http://fedup.com.au/ Both these websites will be very helpful in dealing with food intolerance.

Katherine said...

I have sulphite/salicylate sensitivity, and my two wonderful cooking/baking friends Sarah and Becky have come to my rescue! I hope you will all find their recipes as helpful and delicious as I have!

http://sulphiteandsalicylatefreerecipes.wordpress.com/